Visiting Historical Sights in Manhattan

For the final day of our trip, we split up. Marcos went back to Maria’s house, and Brendan and I went into the City again with Alice and the kids.

New York Skyline

New York Skyline

New York Skyline

Ferry to NYC

We took the ferry in…

New York Skyline

New York Skyline

New York Skyline

One World Trade Center

We started at One World Trade and the 9/11 Memorial.

One World Trade Center

We didn’t go to the Observatory, or even into the museum. We’ll definitely come back to do that on another trip, when we have more time. The memorial was beautiful.

9/11 Memorial

9/11 Memorial

9/11 Memorial

It was very sobering.

9/11 Memorial

****** John Ogonowski wore two uniforms: his navy blue senior captain’s uniform for American Airlines and the blue jeans and denim shirt he wore while working on his 150- acre farm in Dracut, Mass., where he lived with his wife and three daughters.

Twelve days a month, Mr. Ogonowski, 50, flew transcontinental flights. On off days, he tended the farm’s peach orchard, with acres set aside for corn, pumpkins and hay. After supper he often sat in his favorite chair, reading agricultural journals late into the evening.

Mr. Ogonowski joined the Air Force at the height of the Vietnam War. He flew C-141 transport planes, taking equipment to Asia, and sometimes flying back to the States carrying the bodies of American soldiers. He became a commercial pilot in 1979, and met a pretty flight attendant named Peggy, whom he later married.

The morning of Sept. 11, he left his wife at home, still in bed. It was already dawn as he turned down the road in his dusty green Chevy truck, to start his drive to Boston and to Logan International Airport. As he passed his uncle’s nearby house, he tooted his horn. Mr. Ogonowski was the captain of Flight 11, the first plane to crash into the World Trade Center.

Profile published in THE NEW YORK TIMES on December 3, 2001.

9/11 Memorial

9/11 Memorial

Every morning the 9/11 Memorial commemorates the birthdays of the victims, by placing a single white rose inside their name on the parapets.

9/11 Memorial

****In his 23 years, Bobby Hughes earned a number of nicknames. His friends called him Party Bob, because he enjoyed his time away from the office. When he bought a new car, his family called him Lexus Bob.

As a fan of the St. Louis Cardinals, Mr. Hughes would go to Shea Stadium with his father, grandfather, sisters and uncle to be a vocal minority for the Cardinals when they played the Mets. But he never earned the nickname Cardinal Bob.

His most important nickname was Bank of America Bob, his parents said, because he lived for his job as a margins clerk. As the son of an electrician from Sayreville, N.J., Mr. Hughes started dreaming of a job on Wall Street when he was a freshman at Sayreville War Memorial High School. “He loved the whole lifestyle,” said his father, Robert Hughes Sr. “He loved the excitement of that business world, the money, the way they dress, everything. That’s all he ever wanted to do.”

Mr. Hughes attended Montclair State University but was so eager to begin working on Wall Street that he started at the Bank of America in the World Trade Center five months before graduation. For those months he took his remaining two classes at night while living with an aunt, Kathy Hughes, in Lyndhurst, N.J.

After graduating, he moved back with his parents and began his schedule of waking up at 5:30 a.m. and arriving home at 7 p.m., or later if he went out with friends. He liked living at home, but had other plans. “He mentioned that he would like to get an apartment in New York,” said his mother, Louise Hughes, “because he insisted he was going to make it big.”

Profile published in THE NEW YORK TIMES on March 24, 2002.

9/11 Memorial

9/11 Memorial

9/11 Memorial

9/11 Memorial

9/11 Memorial

***** Lashawana Johnson’s name was the stuff of family legend. When her mother sat down to print the name on her birth certificate, she inadvertently inserted an “a” between the “w” and the “n.” Spelled “Lashawana” but pronounced “Lashawna,” the name was a constant source of confusion to people.

Not that Ms. Johnson, 27, minded. She extended the same consideration to co- workers and strangers that she showed to her three children, whose photographs lined her cubicle on the 83rd floor of 1 World Trade Center, where she worked as a customer service manager for General Telecom. A single mother to 7-year-old Jade Ashley, 5-year-old Jerrard Maurice and 2- year-old Jordan Timothy, Ms. Johnson spent most of her free time either with her kids or devising ways to surprise them.

“Many times, she would come in with packages from the World Trade Center mall — shirts, blouses, pants, outfits — all for those kids,” said Willie Borrero, who worked with Ms. Johnson.

To support her family, Ms. Johnson, who lived in East New York, Brooklyn, awoke at 4 a.m., got her kids dressed and off to the sitter’s by 5:30 a.m., and often arrived at her office in time to see the sun rise. On weekends, she was up early and out the door with her children again. “She made sure that every weekend they were very active,” said Ms. Johnson’s mother, Lois Johnson. “They never stayed home.”

Profile published in THE NEW YORK TIMES on December 11, 2001.

9/11 Memorial

9/11 Memorial

9/11 Memorial

****** Allen P. Boyle was born on October 3, 1970 in New York. He moved to Arizona as a young adult, where he met and married Ronda. Ronda was a member of the U.S. Marine Corps. The couple was stationed at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. When Ronda was honorably discharged, she and Allen moved to Virginia and were employed at the Pentagon. Allen was a loving husband and father to Dylan, 3; Allen, 2; and a new addition to the Boyle family due December 5, 2001.
He was a loyal employee and a proud American. He will be greatly missed by all who knew him.

9/11 Memorial

9/11 Memorial

******* Mary Jane Booth, 64, was a lifelong resident of Northern Virginia, growing up in Arlington and settling in Falls Church. She had worked for American Airlines for 45 years and was secretary to American’s general manager at Dulles International Airport for more than three decades, arriving shortly after the airport opened.

She was known by almost everyone who worked at Dulles, and there were few things about the airport or its people that she didn’t know. “She was the friendly glue that kept everyone together,” airport manager, Keith Meurlin, said. “She’d take you under her wing and teach you the airline business.” “At this airport, she was a mother to everyone,” said Dennis Hazell, the latest who had come to think of himself as “her” general manager. She was fondly called “M.J.” except at the annual American Airlines holiday party, when she dressed the part and everyone called her Mrs. Santa Claus.

On September 11th, M.J. boarded her airline’s Flight 77, en route to a Las Vegas meeting of the employee’s credit union. As word spread that she was aboard the plane that hit the Pentagon, hotels, flower shops, and other businesses with which she had dealt, began sending condolences.

Mary Jane had lost her husband, Jim, some 18 months before September 11th. They had no children, but she loved her yellow Labrador retriever, Addie, as if she was one. She spent many hours exercising, gardening and cooking, and enjoyed the love and fellowship of her family and many friends.

9/11 Memorial

9/11 Memorial

******** When he was a teenager in Glen Rock, N.J., Christopher Sean Caton — known as Sean — had his own band, which for some reason was called the Family Goffer. “They once did a benefit concert for a girl who had leukemia,” recalled his sister, Alison Henderson. “They were really idolized by all the other kids.”

After high school, Mr. Caton moved away from Glen Rock, first to Arizona, where he attended Arizona State University, and later to Manhattan, where he got a job as a bond trader for Cantor Fitzgerald, the same company where his father had worked. “He loved it there, he loved the people, but honestly, he wanted to be a rock star,” Ms. Henderson said.

“There were many many nights down at the shore when he would be at a bar, and he would grab the microphone, and start singing,” she said. “He loved being on stage; he loved being in the limelight. He always made an impression: people always remembered Sean Caton.”

He would have turned 35 today.

As a boy, his favorite band was Kiss. But he soon moved on to Bruce Springsteen: Ms. Henderson found 35 ticket stubs to Springsteen concerts in his bedroom.

Every summer he returned to Manasquan, on the Jersey Shore, where he and his friends rented a house. “Manasquan was his favorite place on earth,” Ms. Henderson recalled.

Profile published in THE NEW YORK TIMES on November 27, 2001.

9/11 Memorial

9/11 Memorial

Ten House Memorial

***The Day the Sky turned Black

For the firefighters of the Ten House, Sept. 11 was the day a blue sky turned black and bodies rained from the sky. They were beginning a new shift, at 8:46 a.m., when terrorists attacked the World Trade Towers, spiking them with two hijacked commercial planes, each loaded with 20,000 gallons of jet fuel.

Ladder Company 10 and Engine Company 10, the Ten House 10 are located at 124 Liberty St., across the street from the World Trade Center. It is the only fire station inside Ground Zero.

The firefighters on duty all jumped up from the table and ran to the front of the apparatus bay. The sky was completely black. It was just all debris raining down on the street, papers on fire, pieces of computer, bodies just flying out, just things coming at the firefighters …

They were the first to respond. The two companies lost five men that morning. When they found the burnt wreckage of Ladder 10, weeks later, it was buried under 40 feet of rubble.

The following pages contain stories and photos to honor and remember the lost Brothers of the Ten House and the sacrifices made on September 11, 2001.  These stories and photos help to preserve the history surrounding the events of that day.

Ten House Memorial

Never forget. For more information on these Brave heroes, visit the memorial website here.

Ten House Memorial

After the Memorial, I wanted to see Trinity Church. My family knows me all too well, so they gave me a strict time limit of 30 minutes to spend there, LOL.

Trinity Church, Manhattan

********* The Trinity Church has been to significant to New York City’s history for over three hundred years. The original church was built in 1698 in downtown New York City in Wall Street, specifically facing the Hudson River. It was built because in 1696, members of the Church of England (Anglicans) protested to obtain a “charter granting the church legal status” in New York City. During the Revolutionary War, the first Trinity Church was taken apart and destroyed because of the Great Fire in 1776.

Due to the fact that there was no physical Trinity Church, St. Paul’s Chapel was then used during the time that the second Trinity Church was being built. This time, the second Trinity Church was built facing Wall Street and was longer, wider and two hundred feet tall. Building the church to be bigger was beneficial because the population of New York City was now expanding. In 1838, the church physically began to weaken, therefore it was recommended to take down the entire church and build a new one instead of just rebuild what was wrong because of how bad the conditions were. Second Trinity Church was politically significant because President Washington and members of his government often worshiped this church. Additional parishioners were John Jay and Alexander Hamilton.

This new church, the Third Trinity Church was built in 1846 and is considered the first and finest example of Neo-Gothic architecture in America. It was also once considered the tallest building in New York City, with a two hundred and eighty-one-foot height. This church still stands in downtown Manhattan today, specifically Wall Street.

During the September 11, 2001 attacks, as the 1st Tower collapsed, people took refuge from the massive debris cloud inside the church.

Trinity Church, Manhattan

Trinity Church, Manhattan

It’s easy to forget that all of these headstones were hand carved, as they all look so perfect. It almost looks like a machine did the lettering.  But sometimes they did make mistakes, and miscalculate. This headstone should read, “remains of.” You can see they tried to fix it by adding the tiny remaining letters to top right. It was too costly to start over again.

Trinity Church, Manhattan

Trinity Church, Manhattan

Trinity Church, Manhattan

Angelica Schuyler (Alexander Hamilton’s Sister-in-law) is buried in a family plot, that belongs to her husband’s side.

Trinity Church, Manhattan

Trinity Church, Manhattan

Trinity Church, Manhattan

It’s pretty weird to look out and see “The City” bustling along, around the old cemetery.

Trinity Church, Manhattan

Trinity Church, Manhattan

Many of the graves in Trinity Church have a flying angel, representing Resurrection.

Trinity Church, Manhattan

1793

In Memory of

Eight Children

sons and daughters of

Silas & Charity Totten.

Of such is the kingdom of Heaven

Dear tender parents weep no more
Nor think your infant offspring lost
They’re only gone awhile before
And Jesus keeps the sleeping dust.

Trinity Church, Manhattan

Trinity Church, Manhattan

Trinity Church, Manhattan

Trinity Church, Manhattan

Trinity Church, Manhattan

Trinity Church, Manhattan
Trinity Church, Manhattan

Trinity Church, Manhattan

Trinity Church, Manhattan

Trinity Church, Manhattan

*Mrs. Dalzell, a 28-year-old wife and the mother of a young child, died of an illness or injury which she and her family evidently anticipated would prove fatal. Her epitaph reads:
“Adieu my dearest Babe & tender Husband dear
the time of my departure is now drawing near
And when I am laid low in the silent Grave
where the Monarch is equal with the Slave
Weep not my friends, I hope to be at rest
to be with Jesus Christ it is the best”
Her brown sandstone stele appears to be the work of William Grant, a Boston carver who moved to New York City c.1740, and shortly afterwards to Newark, NJ.

Trinity Church, Manhattan

Trinity Church, Manhattan

Trinity Church, Manhattan

“Here lies the Body of Mr. WILLIAM BRADFORD Printer, who departed this life May 23, 1752, aged 92 Years. He was born in Leicestershire, in Old England in 1660.and came over to America in 1682, before the City of Philadelphia was laid out. He was Printer to this Government .upwards of 50 Years, and being quite worn out with Old age and labour, he left this mortal State in the lively Hope of a blessed Immortality.
Reader, reflect how soon you’ll quit the Stage. You’ll find but few who atain to such an Age. Life is full of Pain. Lo here’s a Place of Rest. Prepare to meet your GOD, then you are blest.
Here also lies the Body of Elizabeth Wife to the said William Bradford, who departed this Life July 8, 1731 aged 68 Years.
RESTORED WITH THE ORIGINAL INSCRIPTION BY THE VESTRY OF TRINITY CHURCH MAY 1863

**Bradford established the American colony’s first press, in Philadelphia, after his emigration from England in 1683. He defended press freedom and was tried for sedition in 1692. He was not convicted and moved to New York where he became a Trinity Vestryman in 1703. He created the first edition of the Book of Common Prayer to be printed in America in 1710.

Trinity Church, Manhattan

Trinity Church, Manhattan

I didn’t spend a lot of time inside the church… The clock was ticking, lol.

Trinity Church, Manhattan

Trinity Church, Manhattan

Trinity Church, Manhattan

Trinity Church, Manhattan

Trinity Church, Manhattan

Trinity Church, Manhattan

The most popular residents of the Trinity Church Cemetery are Alexander Hamilton and family.

Trinity Church, Manhattan

Trinity Church, Manhattan

Trinity Church, Manhattan

Trinity Church, Manhattan

Trinity Church, Manhattan

Trinity Church, Manhattan

Brendan would want you to know that he doesn’t carry a handbag, LOL. He’s holding mine, so I could take the picture.

Charging Bull

After Trinity, we headed over towards Wall Street.

Charging Bull

We came across Hillary Clinton’s Campaign Headquarters. Pretty neat.

Hillary's Headquarters

Hillary's Headquarters

Hillary's Headquarters

Hillary's Headquarters

Hillary's Headquarters

Looking inside you can see a “love Trumps hate” banner, and over on the right you can see a picture of the “Nasty Woman” herself. Lol. The election was only two days away, and people were pretty excited. I would have gone in to take a few pictures, but I wasn’t sure if it was appropriate. Considering I collect political buttons, I should have at least tried to get a few. Oh, well.

St. Paul's Chapel

That’s St. Paul’s Chapel, which is the oldest public building in continuous use in New York City. I wanted to go check it out, but I thought I’d have a mutiny on my hands if I even asked. Next time!

St. Paul's Chapel

Federal Hall

This is Federal Hall, and the site where George Washington was inaugurated President in 1789.

Federal Hall

And the Stock Exchange…

New York Stock Exchange

We had an early dinner at Fraunces Tavern, which is where George Washington gave his farewell speech. It is Manhattan’s oldest surviving building. They have a museum too, which we should have done, but didn’t. Just something else to add to the list for next time.

Fraunces Tavern

********** In 1762, Fraunces opened the Sign of Queen Charlotte (Queen’s Head Tavern), named for England’s Queen Charlotte, at 54 Pearl Street. In 1765, Fraunces leased management of the Tavern.

As the rebellion against England started to heat up, Samuel Fraunces left New York for Elizabeth, New Jersey (1775). He left the operation of the Tavern to his Loyalist son-in-law, Charles Campbell, during the British occupation of New York. The Tavern irregularly provided food, drink and community throughout the war. In 1780, Governor Tyron hosted a dinner for 70 at the Tavern, which was attended by the Council and some British generals.

The surrender of the British at York Town in October of 1781 did not end the Tavern’s role in the Revolution. Thousands of Loyalist refugees flooded New York City searching for a way to start a new life elsewhere in the British Empire. This included thousands of slaves, many of whom left Patriot masters and joined the British Army in return for their freedom. American slave owners and catchers wandered the city streets looking for the Black Loyalists. In order to uphold Britain’s promises, General Birch oversaw trials held weekly at the Tavern. Here the Loyalists proved their service to the crown and received certificates ensuring their freedom and safe passage out of New York City.

By 1783, Fraunces Tavern resumed normal operations and it was reported that “Continental Gentlemen” once again assembled there. The American Commissioners made the house their headquarters while negotiations with the British concerning their evacuation from the City were underway. After several individuals were apprehended with counterfeit money, a trial was held between July and August of 1783 at the Tavern, conducted by the commissioners. The Americans gave a dinner for their British counterparts at the Tavern.

On November 25, 1783, British troops left New York City – the last American city to be occupied. This day would later be referred to as Evacuation Day. George Washington led his Continental Army in a parade from Bull’s Head Tavern in the Bowery to Cape’s Tavern on Broadway and Wall Street. New York Governor George Clinton’s Evacuation Day celebration was held at Fraunces Tavern. During the week of Evacuation Day George Washington was in the City, and he made use of the Tavern by dining in and ordering take-out.

On December 4, 1783, nine days after the last British soldiers left American soil, George Washington invited the officers of the Continental Army to join him in the Long Room of Fraunces Tavern so he could say farewell. The best known account of this emotional leave-taking comes from the Memoirs of Colonel Benjamin Tallmadge, written in 1830 and now in the collection of Fraunces Tavern Museum. As Tallmadge recalled,

“The time now drew near when General Washington intended to leave this part of the country for his beloved retreat at Mt. Vernon. On Tuesday the 4th of December it was made known to the officers then in New York that General Washington intended to commence his journey on that day.

At 12 o’clock the officers repaired to Fraunces Tavern in Pearl Street where General Washington had appointed to meet them and to take his final leave of them. We had been assembled but a few moments when his excellency entered the room. His emotions were too strong to be concealed which seemed to be reciprocated by every officer present. After partaking of a slight refreshment in almost breathless silence the General filled his glass with wine and turning to the officers said, ‘With a heart full of love and gratitude I now take leave of you. I most devoutly wish that your latter days may be as prosperous and happy as your former ones have been glorious and honorable.’

After the officers had taken a glass of wine General Washington said ‘I cannot come to each of you but shall feel obliged if each of you will come and take me by the hand.’ General Knox being nearest to him turned to the Commander-in-chief who, suffused in tears, was incapable of utterance but grasped his hand when they embraced each other in silence. In the same affectionate manner every officer in the room marched up and parted with his general in chief. Such a scene of sorrow and weeping I had never before witnessed and fondly hope I may never be called to witness again.”

The officers escorted Washington from the Tavern to the Whitehall wharf, where he boarded a barge that took him to Paulus Hook, (now Jersey City) New Jersey. Washington continued to Annapolis, where the Continental Congress was meeting, and resigned his commission.

Old Postcard of Fraunces Tavern

Fraunces Tavern

Fraunces Tavern

Fraunces Tavern

Washington's Farewell to His Officers. 1783. Copy of engraving by Phillibrown after Alonzo Chappel.

Fraunces Tavern

It was super dark inside, and I didn’t want to use the flash and disturb anyone.

Fraunces Tavern

Fraunces Tavern

Fraunces Tavern

Fraunces Tavern

Fraunces Tavern

Fraunces Tavern

Fraunces Tavern

Fraunces' Tavern 2016 Menu

The oldest menu I could find from the Tavern is dated 1907. The prices have changed quite a bit!

Fraunces' Tavern 1907 Menu

Fraunces' Tavern 1907 Menu

Fraunces' Tavern 1907 Menu

Courtesy of The New York Public Library. www.nypl.org

Fraunces Tavern

All of us either had the chicken pot pie, or a burger. Both were great!

Fraunces Tavern

Brendan wanted to go into some of the high-end stores on 5th Ave, but there was only time for one. He chose Gucci.

Gucci

He was pretty surprised when I said he could get a belt. Seeing Hamilton was my big thrill, this was his.

Gucci

He was a happy camper.

Gucci

Trump Tower

Trump Tower was right next door to Gucci, so we got to see that as well.

Trump Tower

I wanted a button, but I didn’t have any cash. Bummer.

Trump Tower

There were definitely more news cameras in front of Trump Tower than Hillary’s headquarters. I wonder if they paid those people? It was actually pretty peaceful. I expected there to be a lot of protesters and such.  I wanted to go in, but there was dissension in the ranks, for obvious reasons. To me, it’s all history… Both sides.

Trump Tower

I had to get a picture! Ha ha! I never in a million years thought he was gonna win…

Trump Tower

Tiffany’s!

Tiffany & Co.

After Trump Tower, we headed over to the Plaza for coffee and snacks.

The Plaza, New York

The Plaza, New York

Eloise at The Plaza, New York

And there she is, Eloise, the Plaza’s most famous resident!

The Plaza, New York

Marcos picked us up after dessert, as it was late and time to go home. We didn’t really do that much, but it was fun.

One World Trade

Hopefully, the next time we come, we’ll have a few days to spend the city. I miss it already.

 

 

*Find A Grave, Trinity Churchyard, Mary Dalzell, www.findagrave.com

**Find A Grave, Trinity Churchyard, William Bradford, www.findagrave.com

***FDNY Tenhouse, Tenhouse Bravest, http://www.fdnytenhouse.com/911/

**** Remember September 11, 2001, The Legacy.com

***** Remember September 11, 2001, The Legacy.com

****** The National 9/11 Pentagon Memorial,  Biographies, www.pentagonmemorial.org

*******  The National 9/11 Pentagon Memorial,  Biographies, www.pentagonmemorial.org

********  Remember September 11, 2001, The Legacy.com

********* Wikipedia, Trinity Church (Manhattan),https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page

********** Fraunces Tavern Museum, 54 Pearl Street History, http://frauncestavernmuseum.org/about/history-of-fraunces-tavern/

 

2 Comments

  1. JimH
    November 4, 2017 / 2:20 PM

    You did a pretty good tour for just a couple of days. Nice photos and notes. I lived in the NYC area for 40+ years and never visited most of the sites. Thanks!

    • November 7, 2017 / 11:31 AM

      Oh, Thank you! The area is so rich with history, I can’t wait to go back!

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